THE ROLE OF TELEMEDICINE STRATEGIES IN LAW ENFORCEMENT OFFICERS WITH OBSTRUCTIVE SLEEP APNEA (COPS II)

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Study Overview

Member of the Philadelphia police force for at least three years and plan to continue to be for the next five years, and have never been diagnosed with a medical condition called obstructive sleep apnea (OSA). If you have sleep apnea, your throat may close partly or completely during sleep, which causes oxygen levels in your blood to fall briefly. Sleep apnea may cause sleepiness during the day, and treating sleep apnea improves daytime sleepiness. The usual treatment for sleep apnea is not a pill, but a device that is worn during sleep called positive airway pressure (PAP). The PAP device blows a gentle stream of air into the throat while you sleep, to keep your airway open while you sleep.

Study Description

The purpose of the study is to do the following: 1) To evaluate a program to manage sleep apnea, which uses new software to track use of treatment so that patients get the greatest possible benefit from treatment (U-Sleep, ResMed, Inc.). 2) We would like to measure symptoms and possible outcomes of sleep apnea, including: daytime sleepiness and falling asleep during meetings, accidents, administrative errors, fatigue-related safety violations, anger toward suspects that is difficult to control, and being absent from work.

  • Study Identifier: 833626

Recruitment Status

Enrolling By Invitation

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