Primary Open-Angle African-American Glaucoma Genetics Study (POAAGG)

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Study Overview

This study investigates the genetic basis of primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) in the African American population.

Study Description

Glaucoma is the leading cause of irreversible vision loss worldwide, affecting approximately 70 million people. Primary open-angle glaucoma (POAG) is the most common form of the disease, and there is currently no cure. The cause of POAG is unclear, but multiple studies have found that the disease disproportionately affects the African American population more than any other ethnic group, particularly those with a positive family history. This suggests that genetic factors may influence the development of the disease. The goal of the Primary Open-Angle African American Glaucoma Genetics (POAAGG) study is to understand the genetic basis of POAG, as well as other ocular and environmental factors that lead to disease development in African Americans. This discovery would enable earlier detection and better treatment of the disease in the future. This study enrolls both patients with and without POAG to compare the two groups. Enrollment entails receiving a full eye examination by a glaucoma specialist, providing a small saliva sample, and answering a brief family and medical history survey. All saliva samples are de-identified for genetic analysis.

Additional Information:

To find out if you qualify for this study, call 215-712-8336 or fill out the form below.

  • Study Identifier: 812036

Recruitment Status

Open

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